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nephillymike
I try to share this around this time of the year to illustrate the life changing nature of what these guys go thru this time of year.

The rookie minimum for someone making an NFL roster is $465,000.

The minimum for 17 weeks of practice squad work is $119,000.

The average starting salary for a 2017 college graduates across all majors is $50,000,

The average starting salaries across the lower paying majors many athletes take is $38,000

Even though the practice squad isn't glamorous, they do get paid meals and other perks that normal working folk don't get. They also get the chance to spend a cup of tea on the main squad and they get a min three games NFL pay when they do, a nice extra $60,000 bump for that stay.

Big ramifications for these young men.
Pila
QUOTE (nephillymike @ Sep 3 2017, 12:26 AM) *
I try to share this around this time of the year to illustrate the life changing nature of what these guys go thru this time of year.

The rookie minimum for someone making an NFL roster is $465,000.

The minimum for 17 weeks of practice squad work is $119,000.

The average starting salary for a 2017 college graduates across all majors is $50,000,

The average starting salaries across the lower paying majors many athletes take is $38,000

Even though the practice squad isn't glamorous, they do get paid meals and other perks that normal working folk don't get. They also get the chance to spend a cup of tea on the main squad and they get a min three games NFL pay when they do, a nice extra $60,000 bump for that stay.

Big ramifications for these young men.

That's a great insight into these marginal pro players. Great post.

The life of a provisional European professional athlete goes a bit different. In Europe, young prodigies get paid as soon as they're in an academy of a professional team. They live on campus, which rivals universities. They're schooled and are provided for while under contract. Includes meals and allowances for leisure shit, like phones and whatever makes their lives complete. Quite a bit different for the American provisional professional athlete that might not begin to earn until well into adulthood.

Which underlines your post.
The Franchise
Not to mention the guys who make it but have minimal contracts with little to no guaranteed money.

You get drafted in the later rounds, get offered a 4 year deal for $2.5 mil. Your ticket to making the roster is special teams.

-39.6% is taxed Federally
$990,000

-You get taxed in each state you play in, and in several cities extra. Let's just say another 5% on average.
$125,000

-Your agent gets 3%
$75,000

-NFL Union dues are $15,000

That's $1,205,000 gone already, and that's assuming you play out your entire contract. Most special teamers don't get that far. If you get an unlucky injury they can just cut you, and every year you have another several hundred guys gunning for your job, who are younger and haven't taken NFL hits. All this while being in your early 20's and having more money than you could ever dream of, with your friends from back home wanting you to party with them, and the groupies who tag along and dig for gold. After, of course, most of these guys won't have the means to make a professional salary. No wonder so many go broke.
Zero
And all the while, there are others in the league who aren't athletes and never were who are making $$$$. I'm not a fan of unions in general, but this adds perspective from both sides.
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